Workshop Programme

 

Thursday, 30 May 2013

Please note that almost all workshops are already fully booked.

Please download the complete detailed workshop overview here.

 

08:00-09:30

Meeting Room 224

WS1: Giving Feedback to Palliative Care Learners

As the interdisciplinary field of palliative care grows and training programs move toward more stringent requirements, like program accreditation and site visits, the provision of effective competency-based feedback to trainees becomes increasingly important and relevant. Educators giving feedback to learners need opportunities to practice and receive feedback themselves.

The objectives of this session are to:

1) Reflect on the challenges of giving feedback to learners, general and those more specific to palliative care

2) Identify specific strategies for overcoming challenges to giving learner feedback in the palliative care setting

3) Practice skills for giving feedback using a structured approach appropriate for palliative care bedside teaching

Participants will leave this session with an expanded sense of the challenges in this area, increased familiarity with guiding principles from the literature, practical strategies and skills practice opportunity, an action plan, and numerous resources.

(registration required)

08:30-10:30

Club E

WS2: Teaching Symptom Management in Palliative Care

Interactive seminar about teaching the management of most common symptoms. The workshop will demonstrate a variety of methods and teaching styles and their impact on knowledge and skills improvement.

The workshop is designed for doctors, physicians and health care professionals involved in teaching palliative care.

Translation into Czech will be available!

(registration required)

09:00-12:30

Club C

WS3: Development of palliative care in long term care settings for older people: collaborations between practice and research

Palliative care provision in long term care settings for older people is of increasing importance internationally. The aim of this workshop is to establish a platform for rigorous research around palliative care provision in
long term care settings. In the workshop we present the recently completed work of the EAPC Taskforce on palliative care in long term care settings for older people. The following questions will then be considered:

What research designs have been used to support the development of palliative care in long term care settings?

What outcome measures are appropriate for this population and context?

How do we translate research into practice?

After a series of short presentations, discussion groups will be facilitated to further explore the issues. This workshop will be of interest to clinical staff and researchers whose work focuses on palliative care in long term care settings for older people.

09:00-13:00

Club D

WS4: Integration of Oncology and Specialized Palliative Care (In collaboration with ESMO and MASCC

Goals:

1) to learn current situations, evidence and experiences on the three topics

2) to discuss with experts and peers own experiences and challenges

  • Developing sustained continuous service models adapted for local realities
  • Education of Oncologist in Palliative Care: building both competences and culture
  • Clinical practice tools in daily practice: domains, evidence and experiences

Target population: Professionals and researchers with interest in early integration

(registration required)

09:00-16:30

Club A

WS0: Colourful Life of Hospice Volunteers in Europe
Symposium for Hospice volunteers and about volunteering in Hospice and Palliative Care

Target group:
                  
  • volunteers in the field of hospice and palliative care
  • managers of volunteers
Aims:

  • to encourage and support hospice volunteers as part of European hospice and palliative care
  • to sustain the significance of hospice volunteer work in Europe and within EAPC
  • networking and exchange on an European level
  • founding a task force for hospice volunteering within EAPC
Topics:

  • Future of Volunteering in Europe 2020
  • Management of Volunteers
  • Training of Volunteers
  • Volunteers involved directly in care – how can that work?
Languages: English/German/Czech

(Registration required. If you intend to visit not the full congress but only this workshop please contact the registration office INTERPLAN in order to get further instructions: eapc2013@interplan.de)

10:00-11:30

Meeting Room 224

WS5: Education in Spiritual Care and Spirituality

Aim is to engage participants in participating in finding a way forward to enable good quality, useful education in the provision of spirituality and spiritual care across the EAPC countries and is aimed at all profession groups. It will be discussed how an EAPC wide education course might look and what content it may have.

11:00-13:00

Club E

WS6: The Role of Leadership in Palliative Care

The workshop will show how to lead a multidisciplinary team in decision making in non-cancer patients. Issues such as a role and a position of a palliative care in a health system, importance of a cooperation within a multidisciplinary team, communication skills, influence of media strategy and above all personal experience are the key topics. This workshop will demonstrate and explain these topics by presenting model situations in geriatric palliative care.

The workshop is designed for doctors, physicians and health care professionals involved in teaching and leading palliative medicine or palliative care teams.

Translation into Czech will be available!

(registration required)

11:30-13:00

Club B

WS7: Evidence Based Strategies to Support Family Carers

Focus of the workshop lies on outlining examples of family carer interventions or strategies that have direct practical applicability and are evidence based.

(registration required)

13:00-14:30

Club C

WS8: Palliative Medicine in the Community – A Workshop by the EAPC Primary Palliative Care Taskforce

This workshop is for palliative medicine specialists and generalists (nurses, doctors and others) interested in promoting palliative care in the community. The results of the EAPC Taskforce work around barriers and
facilitators in various European countries will be presented, and a statement about the strategic importance of palliative care in the community to reach all patients in need will be officially made. All workshop participants will advise on the suitability of guidelines being produced to advocate for and help more palliative care to be delivered in primary care in their own countries. Thus participants from all European countries are warmly invited.

(registration required)

13:00-14:30

Meeting Room 222

WS9: Legal Services for Palliative Care Patients

Moderator: Faith Mwangi-Powell (USA)

Presenters: Nino Kiknadze (Georgia), Victoria Tymoshevska (Ukraine), Zipporah Ali (Kenya), Liz Gwyther (South Africa), Faith Mwangi-Powell (USA)

Palliative care aims to improve quality of life, but legal, social and financial problems trouble patients and their families. Legal challenges include questions about how to write a will, how to create legal guardianship for children after a parent’s death and protect inheritance rights, e.g. for the family home. How to manage debt and secure social benefits, grapple with discrimination and violence, navigate application procedures for identity documents & death certificates are common concerns that require legal expertise.

Participants will be able to:

  • identify legal problems often faced by patients and families
  • increase their understanding of the informational resources needed by patients and families
  • learn how to engage lawyers in the community and how to identify community legal services

Target group: Hospice, palliative care and community caregivers involved in patient referrals to community social, legal and financial services.

(registration required)

13:30-16:30

Club B

WS10: Social Work: Looking Inward; Looking Outward

This three hour workshop has been organised for delegates working or interested in psychosocial palliative care and for those from non-social work backgrounds to understand how to make the best use of a social worker in the multi-professional team. There will be three main speakers, international experts in the field and time to network. It will be an opportunity for colleagues to share their work and in particular to highlight service development in their own countries. Topics will be:

  • The potential and possibilities of social work in the multi-professional team
  • The EAPC white paper and its recommendation
  • Training social care generalists in palliative care
  • Social Work and international developments
  • New initiatives in social and health care; towards more integrated working

(registration required)

13:30-16:30

Club D

WS11: Physiotherapy in Palliative Care

The workshop will be focused on current and future developments of physiotherapy in palliative care and shows the last years' results of the EAPC taskforce. There will be the possibility for sharing knowledge and experience as well as to discuss with colleagues from various countries and to learn from different health systems. Physiotherapy and occupational therapy are related. A part of the program will be in cooperation of both taskforces.

(registration required)

13:30-16:30

Club E

WS12: Improving the Multi-Professional Management of Cancer-Related Pain

(an EONS Workshop)

Pain in cancer patients is a complex problem with physical, social, psychological and spiritual dimensions. It is one of the most common symptoms experienced by cancer patients and for many it is the most feared. Despite the fact that cancer pain can be controlled in 70 – 90% of patients, many patients continue to endure unnecessary suffering. Breakthrough pain is more difficult to manage than persistent cancer pain and patients with this type of pain are often less satisfied with their opioid therapy. There is not one reason why cancer pain is so poorly managed, indeed the problem is contributed to by not only health professionals, but also by patients, their families and the health system itself.

The purpose of this collaborative workshop between EAPC and EONS is to explore the myriad of barriers that block or hinder the effective relief of cancer-related pain. A combination of presentations, videos and discussion will endeavour to uncover issues of care and treatment that can be addressed through a multi-professional approach. The meeting will seek to identify where professionals can work together more effectively for improved assessment, communication, decision-making and management of pain for better care of cancer patients. The meeting is intended for clinical and medical oncologists, oncology nurses and other health professionals working with cancer patients.

Translation into Czech will be available!

(registration required)

15:00-16:30

Club C

WS13: How do we get our governments to fund hospice and palliative care services?

Moderator: Daniela Mosoiu (Romania)

Presenters: Liz Gwyther (South Africa), Malina Dumitrescu (Romania), Csazba Dosza (Hungary), Liliana Gherman (Moldova), Kseniya Shapoval (Ukraine)

If national governments are to finance quality home based palliative care, inpatient units, day-centers, and outpatient clinics, palliative care providers must work with health economists and policy experts to develop realistic budgets for quality services based on a clear costing framework and comparative analysis between the various services. Such cost analysis must be combined with a well-planned advocacy strategy targeting the necessary government agencies. Objectives Participants will be able to:

  • Identify the funding sources for palliative care in both the public and private sectors
  • identify the information required to calculate the costs of palliative care services
  • identify the minimum set of cost analysis elements for different services (inpatient units, home based palliative care)
  • explain the role of advocacy in financing palliative care services Target group Palliative care providers involved in funding palliative care services

(registration required)

15:00-16:30

Meeting Room 222

WS14: Choosing Spiritual Outcome Measures for Assessment, Audit and Research

Assessing the outcomes of spiritual care (e.g. spiritual well-being) is essential to demonstrate the effectiveness of spiritual care, improve the quality of care through clinical audit and generate evidence to inform spiritual care provision. Recently there has been a proliferation of tools to measure spiritual outcomes; however, there is little guidance for service providers and researchers on the selection of tools.

The aim of the workshop is to provide guidance for clinicians and researchers on the selection of spiritual outcome measures for use in practice and research, using an interactive, creative approach.

(registration required)

15:00-16:30

Meeting Room 223

WS15: Social Media in Palliative Care Advocacy

(registration required)

15:00-16:30

Meeting Room 224

WS16: Providing quality of life for residents with advanced dementia at the end of life: the Namaste Care programme

Namaste means ‘honouring the spirit within’ and provides an organisational daily structure of meaningful activity for residents with very advanced dementia at the end of life. A practical focus to the workshop will help those attending to gain firsthand experience of this innovative programme.

Objectives:

  • to describe the NAMASTE CARE programme for people with advanced dementia at the end of life
  • to highlight the importance of collective sensory stimulation to improve quality of life for people with very advanced dementia
  • to share the experience of different care homes implementing NAMASTE CARE and the journeys they make
  • to feedback the research results from two international studies looking at data from residents, families and staff
  • to learn about the process of implementing such change

(registration required)